The Top 5 Product Marketing Tools: My Honest Review

By

Aleks Tiupikov

Dec 14, 2023

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Looking for the best product marketing tools? You got to the right place.

We've tested 56 tools to create an unbiased list of tools- none of which have paid for their placement.

Ready? Let's dive in!

TLDR:

  1. User Interviews: Great for finding participants for user testing.

  2. Posthog or Mixpanel: Excellent choices for product and customer behavior analytics.

  3. Intercom: Ideal for creating user onboarding guides and new product features announcements.

  4. Useberry: A hidden gem for unmoderated user tests.

  5. Notion: Perfect to create a product marketing wiki, keeping all teams aligned. Product marketing is a crucial aspect of any successful business. To help you navigate the world of product marketing, here are my top 5 tools and a brief review of each.

What is the Product Marketing Tools in a Nutshell

Product marketing tools are your go-to gadgets for two main goals: understanding your target audience better and helping users on their product journey. Let's break these down.

Understanding Your Users

To really get what your potential customers need, you've got to dig deep in your target market. This is where tools for gathering qualitative feedback come in. Think of these as your ears on the ground. They let you hear what your users say, how they feel, and what they truly want from your product. Remember to solicit feedback and analyze customer data regularly.

We're talking about surveys that ask the right questions, analytics tools that show user behavior, and customer feedback platforms that bring honest opinions to your desk. It's not just about collecting data, but about making sense of it to tailor your product and marketing campaigns.

Assisting Users Along Their Journey

Now, onto guiding your users. It's all about crafting those hyper-targeted in-app experiences. Imagine a GPS for your product, showing the user the quickest route to what they need. It's about efficiency and relevance.

If your user needs X, your product doesn't just offer X, it makes finding and using X as smooth as possible. This means personalized experiences, intuitive design, and features that resonate with the user's needs. It's not just about having a great product, but about making sure your users realize it's great because it's easy to use and meets their needs effectively. Building experiences is a great way to drive user engagement.

In essence, top-notch product marketing tools are your secret sauce to not just meet but exceed user expectations. They help product marketing managers listen, understand, and respond in ways that make your users feel valued and understood.

How Did I End Up Testing 42 Tools

As someone always championing users in startups, making users happy has always been my top priority. This is precisely what product marketing teams aim to do. But to do this well, you need the right tools, different ones for different tasks. Here's how I structured my search:

1. Tools for Interviews and User Testing

User testing and interviews are extremely important for delving into the minds of your users. They allow you to have direct conversations, observe real-time usage of your product, and gain deep insights into the user experience. Tools in this category, such as Drift, are designed to facilitate these interactions, making them more efficient and insightful while also helping you collect more user data.

User Testing Platforms

Using platforms like User Interviews, I've been able to directly observe how different users interact with a product. These platforms offer a mix of demographic profiles, allowing for a broad understanding of user behavior and customer segments. In one project, for instance, watching a user struggle with a navigation menu led to a significant design overhaul. The platform's screen recording feature was invaluable in capturing these moments.

Scheduling Tools

Tools like Calendly have streamlined the process of arranging interviews. I remember a project where coordinating interviews was a hassle due to timezone differences. With a scheduling tool, participants could choose their own slots, cutting down the back-and-forth emails significantly. This efficiency meant we could conduct more interviews in a shorter period, enriching our data pool. Additionally, using tools like CoSchedule, product marketers can schedule content and social media posts, manage their team, and collaborate with other product marketers in one place.

Video Conferencing Tools

Platforms like Zoom or Google Meet have become more than just a means to conduct interviews - they're a window into the user's world. Recording these sessions using something like Spoke App allows for a deeper analysis post-interview. I recall an instance where the non-verbal cues of a user, observed in a recorded session, helped us fix the usability checkout problem stopping 10% of users from getting a subscription

Prototype Testing Tools

Tools like ProtoPie or Figma are just the best for prototype testing. We use Figma all the time to quickly iterate on a design based on real-time feedback during user testing sessions. The ability to make changes on the fly and immediately test those changes is a game-changer.

Each of these tools plays a crucial role in the user testing and interview process, offering a window into the user's mind and experience. They're not just about collecting data, but about understanding stories, challenges, and opportunities from the user's perspective.

2. Tools for Product and Behavior Analytics

Understanding user behavior is like reading a map of how they navigate your product. Analytics tools help track and analyze customer journey, uncovering patterns, pain points, and preferences. Here's how I use them in my projects.

Comprehensive Analytics Platforms

I often rely on platforms like Posthog and Mixpanel. They give me a comprehensive overview of user interactions. With these tools, I can track everything from user acquisition to retention, helping me pinpoint where improvements are needed.

Heatmap and Session Recording Tools

Tools like Hotjar or Fullstory extremely useful for visual insights. They show me exactly where users are clicking and how they're navigating through the site. This visual data is invaluable for understanding user behavior beyond what traditional metrics can tell me.

A/B Testing Tools

Finally, tools like VWO are must have in my toolkit for optimizing user experience. Through A/B testing, our team can make data-driven decisions about design and functionality, ensuring that every change leads to tangible improvements in user engagement and conversion rates. We test things all the time.

3. Tools for New User Onboarding

First impressions matter. Tools for onboarding new users are about creating a welcoming and intuitive experience. This is where Product-Led Growth (PLG) and PLM strategies come into play, focusing on the product itself as the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion.

Onboarding as a PLG Cornerstone

In PLG, the product is the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion. The onboarding process, therefore, must be more than just functional. It must be an experience that hooks the user right from the start. It's about showcasing the product's value proposition in the most engaging and intuitive way possible.

Creating a Seamless Experience

When I design onboarding flows, my focus is on creating a seamless, frictionless experience. It's essential to guide users through the product's core functionalities without overwhelming them. This balance is key to retaining their interest and encouraging exploration. The onboarding process should feel like a natural progression, helping users discover features at their own pace and increase product adoption.

Personalization and User Behavior

Personalization plays a huge role in effective onboarding. By tailoring the onboarding experience to the user's behavior and preferences, the product can resonate more deeply with them, creating a personalized, consistent, and real-time customer experience. This approach can significantly boost user engagement and satisfaction. For instance, segmenting users based on their goals and providing relevant walkthroughs can make a big difference.

Feedback Loops and Adaptation

Onboarding is not a set-it-and-forget-it process. It's imperative to establish feedback loops to continually refine the onboarding experience. This means analyzing user behavior during onboarding, identifying drop-off points, and adapting the process accordingly. Regular updates and improvements based on user feedback and behavior data are essential.

Integrating Educational Elements 

Educational components like tooltips, video tutorials, or interactive guides can greatly enhance the onboarding experience. These elements should be integrated in a way that feels organic and helpful, not intrusive. They should empower users to fully utilize the product's capabilities.

The Role of Analytics in Onboarding

To optimize the onboarding process, I always heavily rely on analytics tools. These tools help me understand how new users interact with the onboarding flow and where they might encounter difficulties. This data is critical for making informed decisions about how to improve the onboarding experience.

Community and Support

Finally, building a community and providing excellent support are part of effective onboarding. Users should feel they have easy access to help and resources, and connecting them with a community can enhance their sense of belonging and loyalty to the product.

4. Tools for Conducting User Tests

For moderated tests, simple tools like Zoom work fine. But for unmoderated tests, where users interact with your product on their own, specialized tools are needed to capture user experience and user feedback accurately.

Moderated User Tests

In moderated tests, you directly interact with users as they navigate through the product. This setup allows for immediate feedback and clarification. Tools like Zoom are excellent for these sessions. They offer a simple, reliable platform for video conferencing, screen sharing, and recording sessions. The ability to see and talk to users in real-time provides invaluable insights for product managers. It helps in understanding their thought processes, feelings, and reactions to the product.

Unmoderated User Tests

Unmoderated tests, where users interact with the product independently, require a different set of tools. These tools need to capture user experience without the presence of a moderator. Platforms like Useberry, or Lookback are particularly useful here. They offer features like task creation, screen recording, and user feedback collection. Users can perform tasks at their convenience, providing a more natural and unbiased view of their experience.

Gathering Feedback

Another essential aspect of unmoderated testing tools is their ability to gather feedback. Many of these tools allow users to leave comments or answer questions during or after the test. This feedback is often more candid and revealing, as users are not influenced by the presence of a moderator.

Analyzing Results

Once the tests are completed, the next step is analyzing the results. Above I mentioned the tools that offer robust analytics features. These can include heatmaps, click maps, and user journey analyses. This data helps in identifying patterns, understanding user behavior, and pinpointing areas for improvement.

Integrating Findings into Development

The insights gained from both moderated and unmoderated user tests are super helpful for product development. They inform design decisions, highlight usability issues, and guide feature enhancements. The key is to integrate these findings effectively into the development cycle, ensuring that user feedback directly influences the evolution of the product.

In my experience, the right tools for conducting user tests can make a significant difference in understanding and enhancing user experience. Whether it’s through real-time interactions in moderated tests or independent user exploration in unmoderated tests, the whole idea of user testing helps creating products that truly meet their needs and expectations.

5. Tools to Organize and Share Insights

It's not just about gathering valuable insights, but about making them accessible and understandable to your team. Tools in this category help organize data into segments, personas, and avatars, making it easy for everyone to grasp and use this information.

Building User Personas

Creating user personas is a powerful way to humanize data. I use tools that help in synthesizing data from various sources to build comprehensive user personas. These personas represent typical users and their behaviors, preferences, and needs. This approach helps the team to better understand and empathize with our users, guiding more user-centric product development and marketing strategies.

Developing Avatars for Engagement:

Avatars go a step further than personas. They are more detailed and personalized representations of user segments. I’ve found that tools which allow for the creation of detailed avatars can greatly enhance the team's ability to relate to and understand the needs of different user groups. This results in more targeted and effective product features and marketing campaigns.

Collaborative Platforms for Sharing Insights:

Collaboration is key in making insights actionable. I rely on platforms that facilitate easy sharing and collaboration on insights. Tools like Confluence or Trello are excellent for this, as they allow team members to access, comment on, and discuss insights in a centralized space. This collaborative environment ensures that insights lead to collective action and informed decision-making, making content creation more efficient.

Integrating Insights into Workflow:

Finally, integrating these insights into the daily workflow is crucial. I use tools that can be integrated into our existing work processes, ensuring that insights are not just a one-time revelation but a continuous part of our decision-making process.

In summary, organizing and sharing insights is a critical process in any data-driven product marketing team. The right tools, such as product management tools, not only make data more accessible and understandable but also ensure that these insights are seamlessly integrated into every aspect of the product development and marketing process, driving informed decisions and strategies.

Frustrated by the biased top results in a simple Google search, I realized trial and error was the only way to go. I started with a massive list and trimmed it down to 42 tools, categorizing them into the five groups mentioned.

For each category, I tested several options, evaluating them based on cost, usability, and valuable features. Below, you'll find a detailed spreadsheet with my findings.

Top 5 winners you should add to you stack right now

User Interviews - For Testers Search

When it comes to sourcing participants for user tests, User Interviews stands out as a must-have tool for lots of product marketing campaigns. Its main strength? A seamless experience in finding the right testers. Unlike other platforms that can be pricey and limited in options, User Interviews offers an extensive pool of testers without breaking the bank.

Here's the deal: 85% of their testers are spot-on, meeting my specific criteria. This high match rate is crucial for effective user interviews. You don't waste time sifting through irrelevant candidates.

The pricing is another win. At $90 per B2B tester, plus a custom incentive, it's a bargain. I usually set the incentive at around $1 per minute, which feels fair and has worked well for me. The overall experience with User Interviews? Smooth, efficient, and cost-effective. It's a no-brainer for anyone serious about getting quality feedback through user testing.

Posthog or Mixpanel - For Product and Behavioral Analytics

Choosing the right tool for product and behavioral analytics wasn't a walk in the park. I tested some big names: Amplitude, Mixpanel, Posthog, Heaps, and Kissmetrics. Each of these requires a hefty setup, so it's not something you can trial quickly. But after thorough testing, two stood out: Posthog and Mixpanel.

Why Posthog?

Posthog is your go-to if you're looking for something robust yet user-friendly. It covers a wide range of stuff, probably about 95% of what you'll need in analytics. Plus, it's surprisingly affordable. Posthog has decent visuals – good enough to glean valuable insights. It boasts a range of features like session recording, various analysis models (funnels, retention, stickiness), and A/B testing. The A/B testing feature means you don't have to fork out extra for tools like LaunchDarkly, which your developers will appreciate for its feature flags. Feature flags are a developer's best friend, letting them toggle certain features on or off without deploying new code. Posthog also includes surveys, and they work well, backed by an active community and product team responsive to customer needs.

Why Mixpanel?

On the other hand, if you're after something a bit more polished and user-friendly and don't mind spending more, Mixpanel is a solid choice. However, note that it doesn't include behavior tracking like Hotjar or Fullstory, so you might need to invest in those separately. If that's not a deal-breaker for you, Mixpanel is excellent for getting insights about your website visitors.

In summary, Posthog is a one-stop shop for a lot of your needs and works seamlessly. Mixpanel, while a bit more upscale, may require additional tools for comprehensive tracking. Both are great, but if I had to choose one, I'd lean towards Posthog for its all-in-one functionality and cost-effectiveness.

Intercom - For User Onboarding Guides

Intercom, known for its customer support chatbot, also a powerful tool for onboarding tours and checklists functionality. It's a gem for crafting proactive, engaging onboarding experiences, shifting from the traditional reactive support approach. And can also in my opinion replace you other expensive email marketing tools.

Initially, I considered Appcues. They're known in the space, and I have connections with the team. However, after a deeper dive, I realized Intercom was a step ahead. Appcues' interface, feeling a bit dated like something from 2010, didn't quite click for me. In contrast, Intercom's flow was smooth and intuitive.

What Makes Intercom Stand Out?

The key feature I love in Intercom is the "Series" function. It lets you map out all your communication touchpoints in a single, cohesive flow, enhancing customer engagement. This includes everything from chatbot pop-ups and banners to spotlight tours and checklists. The beauty lies in how you can weave these elements together to guide users swiftly to the value they seek from your product. No unnecessary, skippable steps. Just a straight path to high user activation rates.

Why Intercom is a Tactical Tool

Intercom is a tactical tool that improves your existing product marketing strategy, specifically in terms of customer communication. It's not about using the tool to define your strategy, but about the tool supporting and executing the strategy you've already set. To get the most out of it, understanding your customer avatar is crucial. Who are your users? What are they looking to achieve with your product?

Reading up on PLG Onboarding and customer avatar building can offer deeper insights into these questions. As a product marketer, it's your job to know your customers inside out. Intercom, when used with this understanding, can be a powerful ally in your marketing arsenal.

Useberry - for Unmoderated User Tests

It's surprising how little buzz there is about it. The team in Greece has been bootstrapping for over five years, focusing more on development than marketing. This low-key approach might explain its under-the-radar status. I've got no ties with Useberry, just sharing my honest take.

Let's dive into unmoderated user testing. It's about getting feedback on your product without being in the room. Think Figma prototypes, copy tests, and quick five-second screenshot tests. It's all about understanding how users interact with your product in a real-world setting. The options for conducting these tests are varied, but Useberry bundles them all together.

What stands out about Useberry is its value for money. It offers a comprehensive suite of testing tools that are not only affordable but also user-friendly. In comparison to more well-known tools like Maze, Useberry really hits the mark. Maze is great for learning the ropes of user testing (with their extensive guides), but when it comes to the actionable insights, Useberry's the go-to. I've run over 100 tests with it and the insights have been invaluable.

Another cool feature? You can find people on platforms like MTurk to perform quick, one to two-minute tasks. It's amazing how much you can learn in just a few days from these short, focused tests.

The only hiccup I encountered was with the welcome screen. It didn't quite hit the mark for me in terms of feel and customization. But that's just a personal preference. Overall, Useberry is a solid tool that's definitely worth checking out.

Notion - to have a product marketing wiki for all the teams to stay aligned

Well this is something you might want to skip as you already familiar with it. And I am not here to reveal you the power of Notion. Most likely you already know that (and if not simple googling will be way more helpful than my talking).

What I want to talk explicitly about is how helpful it could be for one thing - bringing other teams of your company attention together around the product marketing efforts, or more specifically - your customers shoes as it’s all about them at the end of the day.

Explain that the problem is there're just so many not user-centered companies out there that really don’t understate damn about what their customers need. So the product marketing role implies that this person or team should breach the gap between the customers and their world and the specific product & marketing teams of a company and their world.

And while in the ideal companies these product marketing roles exist because other teams simply don’t have time to do the user reasearch and benefit a lot from just digesting the research created by PMMs, the reality is that the majority of product marketers exist because other teams simply don’t care about customers. And your job is to change this.

So this lengthy intro was to come to a point why I think Notion is cool for this. Because it’s very easy to use and just enjoyable to a degree that can help you with engaging others. Of course it’s only one piece of it and explain that there’re other things you should be doing like engaging stakeholders on interviews, sending emails, conducting meetings. But at the end of the day the research should be stored in one place. And should be highly accessible to everyone else, outside of product marketing teams.

It’s great if you made the google docs work for you or Confluence (which I’d never use for anything but development documentation, but you know there’re different people out there). If you don’t have it yet - I highly suggest to stick with Notion for the exact reasons above. It just simply does the job.

What are the best product marketing tools available in the market?

The top 5 product marketing tools in the market are User Interviews, Posthog, Intercom, Useberry, and Notion. These tools offer a range of features to help you with marketing automation, qualitative feedback collection, analytics tracking and user testing which is all you need as a product marketer.

Wrapping up - give them a test before making a call

Let's wrap this up. Remember, this list isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to your best product marketing tools needs. It's based on my personal experiences and what I found valuable. These tools worked wonders for me, and our target market but that doesn't guarantee the same for you. Your use case and product marketing strategy might be different.

Before you commit to any of these different tools, give them a test run. See how they fit with your workflow, your product, and most importantly, your users. At the end of the day, the tools you choose should serve your customers above all else. They're the true north of your product marketing journey. So, experiment, evaluate, and choose the tools that align best with your goals and your users' needs. Happy tool hunting.

Looking for the best product marketing tools? You got to the right place.

We've tested 56 tools to create an unbiased list of tools- none of which have paid for their placement.

Ready? Let's dive in!

TLDR:

  1. User Interviews: Great for finding participants for user testing.

  2. Posthog or Mixpanel: Excellent choices for product and customer behavior analytics.

  3. Intercom: Ideal for creating user onboarding guides and new product features announcements.

  4. Useberry: A hidden gem for unmoderated user tests.

  5. Notion: Perfect to create a product marketing wiki, keeping all teams aligned. Product marketing is a crucial aspect of any successful business. To help you navigate the world of product marketing, here are my top 5 tools and a brief review of each.

What is the Product Marketing Tools in a Nutshell

Product marketing tools are your go-to gadgets for two main goals: understanding your target audience better and helping users on their product journey. Let's break these down.

Understanding Your Users

To really get what your potential customers need, you've got to dig deep in your target market. This is where tools for gathering qualitative feedback come in. Think of these as your ears on the ground. They let you hear what your users say, how they feel, and what they truly want from your product. Remember to solicit feedback and analyze customer data regularly.

We're talking about surveys that ask the right questions, analytics tools that show user behavior, and customer feedback platforms that bring honest opinions to your desk. It's not just about collecting data, but about making sense of it to tailor your product and marketing campaigns.

Assisting Users Along Their Journey

Now, onto guiding your users. It's all about crafting those hyper-targeted in-app experiences. Imagine a GPS for your product, showing the user the quickest route to what they need. It's about efficiency and relevance.

If your user needs X, your product doesn't just offer X, it makes finding and using X as smooth as possible. This means personalized experiences, intuitive design, and features that resonate with the user's needs. It's not just about having a great product, but about making sure your users realize it's great because it's easy to use and meets their needs effectively. Building experiences is a great way to drive user engagement.

In essence, top-notch product marketing tools are your secret sauce to not just meet but exceed user expectations. They help product marketing managers listen, understand, and respond in ways that make your users feel valued and understood.

How Did I End Up Testing 42 Tools

As someone always championing users in startups, making users happy has always been my top priority. This is precisely what product marketing teams aim to do. But to do this well, you need the right tools, different ones for different tasks. Here's how I structured my search:

1. Tools for Interviews and User Testing

User testing and interviews are extremely important for delving into the minds of your users. They allow you to have direct conversations, observe real-time usage of your product, and gain deep insights into the user experience. Tools in this category, such as Drift, are designed to facilitate these interactions, making them more efficient and insightful while also helping you collect more user data.

User Testing Platforms

Using platforms like User Interviews, I've been able to directly observe how different users interact with a product. These platforms offer a mix of demographic profiles, allowing for a broad understanding of user behavior and customer segments. In one project, for instance, watching a user struggle with a navigation menu led to a significant design overhaul. The platform's screen recording feature was invaluable in capturing these moments.

Scheduling Tools

Tools like Calendly have streamlined the process of arranging interviews. I remember a project where coordinating interviews was a hassle due to timezone differences. With a scheduling tool, participants could choose their own slots, cutting down the back-and-forth emails significantly. This efficiency meant we could conduct more interviews in a shorter period, enriching our data pool. Additionally, using tools like CoSchedule, product marketers can schedule content and social media posts, manage their team, and collaborate with other product marketers in one place.

Video Conferencing Tools

Platforms like Zoom or Google Meet have become more than just a means to conduct interviews - they're a window into the user's world. Recording these sessions using something like Spoke App allows for a deeper analysis post-interview. I recall an instance where the non-verbal cues of a user, observed in a recorded session, helped us fix the usability checkout problem stopping 10% of users from getting a subscription

Prototype Testing Tools

Tools like ProtoPie or Figma are just the best for prototype testing. We use Figma all the time to quickly iterate on a design based on real-time feedback during user testing sessions. The ability to make changes on the fly and immediately test those changes is a game-changer.

Each of these tools plays a crucial role in the user testing and interview process, offering a window into the user's mind and experience. They're not just about collecting data, but about understanding stories, challenges, and opportunities from the user's perspective.

2. Tools for Product and Behavior Analytics

Understanding user behavior is like reading a map of how they navigate your product. Analytics tools help track and analyze customer journey, uncovering patterns, pain points, and preferences. Here's how I use them in my projects.

Comprehensive Analytics Platforms

I often rely on platforms like Posthog and Mixpanel. They give me a comprehensive overview of user interactions. With these tools, I can track everything from user acquisition to retention, helping me pinpoint where improvements are needed.

Heatmap and Session Recording Tools

Tools like Hotjar or Fullstory extremely useful for visual insights. They show me exactly where users are clicking and how they're navigating through the site. This visual data is invaluable for understanding user behavior beyond what traditional metrics can tell me.

A/B Testing Tools

Finally, tools like VWO are must have in my toolkit for optimizing user experience. Through A/B testing, our team can make data-driven decisions about design and functionality, ensuring that every change leads to tangible improvements in user engagement and conversion rates. We test things all the time.

3. Tools for New User Onboarding

First impressions matter. Tools for onboarding new users are about creating a welcoming and intuitive experience. This is where Product-Led Growth (PLG) and PLM strategies come into play, focusing on the product itself as the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion.

Onboarding as a PLG Cornerstone

In PLG, the product is the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion. The onboarding process, therefore, must be more than just functional. It must be an experience that hooks the user right from the start. It's about showcasing the product's value proposition in the most engaging and intuitive way possible.

Creating a Seamless Experience

When I design onboarding flows, my focus is on creating a seamless, frictionless experience. It's essential to guide users through the product's core functionalities without overwhelming them. This balance is key to retaining their interest and encouraging exploration. The onboarding process should feel like a natural progression, helping users discover features at their own pace and increase product adoption.

Personalization and User Behavior

Personalization plays a huge role in effective onboarding. By tailoring the onboarding experience to the user's behavior and preferences, the product can resonate more deeply with them, creating a personalized, consistent, and real-time customer experience. This approach can significantly boost user engagement and satisfaction. For instance, segmenting users based on their goals and providing relevant walkthroughs can make a big difference.

Feedback Loops and Adaptation

Onboarding is not a set-it-and-forget-it process. It's imperative to establish feedback loops to continually refine the onboarding experience. This means analyzing user behavior during onboarding, identifying drop-off points, and adapting the process accordingly. Regular updates and improvements based on user feedback and behavior data are essential.

Integrating Educational Elements 

Educational components like tooltips, video tutorials, or interactive guides can greatly enhance the onboarding experience. These elements should be integrated in a way that feels organic and helpful, not intrusive. They should empower users to fully utilize the product's capabilities.

The Role of Analytics in Onboarding

To optimize the onboarding process, I always heavily rely on analytics tools. These tools help me understand how new users interact with the onboarding flow and where they might encounter difficulties. This data is critical for making informed decisions about how to improve the onboarding experience.

Community and Support

Finally, building a community and providing excellent support are part of effective onboarding. Users should feel they have easy access to help and resources, and connecting them with a community can enhance their sense of belonging and loyalty to the product.

4. Tools for Conducting User Tests

For moderated tests, simple tools like Zoom work fine. But for unmoderated tests, where users interact with your product on their own, specialized tools are needed to capture user experience and user feedback accurately.

Moderated User Tests

In moderated tests, you directly interact with users as they navigate through the product. This setup allows for immediate feedback and clarification. Tools like Zoom are excellent for these sessions. They offer a simple, reliable platform for video conferencing, screen sharing, and recording sessions. The ability to see and talk to users in real-time provides invaluable insights for product managers. It helps in understanding their thought processes, feelings, and reactions to the product.

Unmoderated User Tests

Unmoderated tests, where users interact with the product independently, require a different set of tools. These tools need to capture user experience without the presence of a moderator. Platforms like Useberry, or Lookback are particularly useful here. They offer features like task creation, screen recording, and user feedback collection. Users can perform tasks at their convenience, providing a more natural and unbiased view of their experience.

Gathering Feedback

Another essential aspect of unmoderated testing tools is their ability to gather feedback. Many of these tools allow users to leave comments or answer questions during or after the test. This feedback is often more candid and revealing, as users are not influenced by the presence of a moderator.

Analyzing Results

Once the tests are completed, the next step is analyzing the results. Above I mentioned the tools that offer robust analytics features. These can include heatmaps, click maps, and user journey analyses. This data helps in identifying patterns, understanding user behavior, and pinpointing areas for improvement.

Integrating Findings into Development

The insights gained from both moderated and unmoderated user tests are super helpful for product development. They inform design decisions, highlight usability issues, and guide feature enhancements. The key is to integrate these findings effectively into the development cycle, ensuring that user feedback directly influences the evolution of the product.

In my experience, the right tools for conducting user tests can make a significant difference in understanding and enhancing user experience. Whether it’s through real-time interactions in moderated tests or independent user exploration in unmoderated tests, the whole idea of user testing helps creating products that truly meet their needs and expectations.

5. Tools to Organize and Share Insights

It's not just about gathering valuable insights, but about making them accessible and understandable to your team. Tools in this category help organize data into segments, personas, and avatars, making it easy for everyone to grasp and use this information.

Building User Personas

Creating user personas is a powerful way to humanize data. I use tools that help in synthesizing data from various sources to build comprehensive user personas. These personas represent typical users and their behaviors, preferences, and needs. This approach helps the team to better understand and empathize with our users, guiding more user-centric product development and marketing strategies.

Developing Avatars for Engagement:

Avatars go a step further than personas. They are more detailed and personalized representations of user segments. I’ve found that tools which allow for the creation of detailed avatars can greatly enhance the team's ability to relate to and understand the needs of different user groups. This results in more targeted and effective product features and marketing campaigns.

Collaborative Platforms for Sharing Insights:

Collaboration is key in making insights actionable. I rely on platforms that facilitate easy sharing and collaboration on insights. Tools like Confluence or Trello are excellent for this, as they allow team members to access, comment on, and discuss insights in a centralized space. This collaborative environment ensures that insights lead to collective action and informed decision-making, making content creation more efficient.

Integrating Insights into Workflow:

Finally, integrating these insights into the daily workflow is crucial. I use tools that can be integrated into our existing work processes, ensuring that insights are not just a one-time revelation but a continuous part of our decision-making process.

In summary, organizing and sharing insights is a critical process in any data-driven product marketing team. The right tools, such as product management tools, not only make data more accessible and understandable but also ensure that these insights are seamlessly integrated into every aspect of the product development and marketing process, driving informed decisions and strategies.

Frustrated by the biased top results in a simple Google search, I realized trial and error was the only way to go. I started with a massive list and trimmed it down to 42 tools, categorizing them into the five groups mentioned.

For each category, I tested several options, evaluating them based on cost, usability, and valuable features. Below, you'll find a detailed spreadsheet with my findings.

Top 5 winners you should add to you stack right now

User Interviews - For Testers Search

When it comes to sourcing participants for user tests, User Interviews stands out as a must-have tool for lots of product marketing campaigns. Its main strength? A seamless experience in finding the right testers. Unlike other platforms that can be pricey and limited in options, User Interviews offers an extensive pool of testers without breaking the bank.

Here's the deal: 85% of their testers are spot-on, meeting my specific criteria. This high match rate is crucial for effective user interviews. You don't waste time sifting through irrelevant candidates.

The pricing is another win. At $90 per B2B tester, plus a custom incentive, it's a bargain. I usually set the incentive at around $1 per minute, which feels fair and has worked well for me. The overall experience with User Interviews? Smooth, efficient, and cost-effective. It's a no-brainer for anyone serious about getting quality feedback through user testing.

Posthog or Mixpanel - For Product and Behavioral Analytics

Choosing the right tool for product and behavioral analytics wasn't a walk in the park. I tested some big names: Amplitude, Mixpanel, Posthog, Heaps, and Kissmetrics. Each of these requires a hefty setup, so it's not something you can trial quickly. But after thorough testing, two stood out: Posthog and Mixpanel.

Why Posthog?

Posthog is your go-to if you're looking for something robust yet user-friendly. It covers a wide range of stuff, probably about 95% of what you'll need in analytics. Plus, it's surprisingly affordable. Posthog has decent visuals – good enough to glean valuable insights. It boasts a range of features like session recording, various analysis models (funnels, retention, stickiness), and A/B testing. The A/B testing feature means you don't have to fork out extra for tools like LaunchDarkly, which your developers will appreciate for its feature flags. Feature flags are a developer's best friend, letting them toggle certain features on or off without deploying new code. Posthog also includes surveys, and they work well, backed by an active community and product team responsive to customer needs.

Why Mixpanel?

On the other hand, if you're after something a bit more polished and user-friendly and don't mind spending more, Mixpanel is a solid choice. However, note that it doesn't include behavior tracking like Hotjar or Fullstory, so you might need to invest in those separately. If that's not a deal-breaker for you, Mixpanel is excellent for getting insights about your website visitors.

In summary, Posthog is a one-stop shop for a lot of your needs and works seamlessly. Mixpanel, while a bit more upscale, may require additional tools for comprehensive tracking. Both are great, but if I had to choose one, I'd lean towards Posthog for its all-in-one functionality and cost-effectiveness.

Intercom - For User Onboarding Guides

Intercom, known for its customer support chatbot, also a powerful tool for onboarding tours and checklists functionality. It's a gem for crafting proactive, engaging onboarding experiences, shifting from the traditional reactive support approach. And can also in my opinion replace you other expensive email marketing tools.

Initially, I considered Appcues. They're known in the space, and I have connections with the team. However, after a deeper dive, I realized Intercom was a step ahead. Appcues' interface, feeling a bit dated like something from 2010, didn't quite click for me. In contrast, Intercom's flow was smooth and intuitive.

What Makes Intercom Stand Out?

The key feature I love in Intercom is the "Series" function. It lets you map out all your communication touchpoints in a single, cohesive flow, enhancing customer engagement. This includes everything from chatbot pop-ups and banners to spotlight tours and checklists. The beauty lies in how you can weave these elements together to guide users swiftly to the value they seek from your product. No unnecessary, skippable steps. Just a straight path to high user activation rates.

Why Intercom is a Tactical Tool

Intercom is a tactical tool that improves your existing product marketing strategy, specifically in terms of customer communication. It's not about using the tool to define your strategy, but about the tool supporting and executing the strategy you've already set. To get the most out of it, understanding your customer avatar is crucial. Who are your users? What are they looking to achieve with your product?

Reading up on PLG Onboarding and customer avatar building can offer deeper insights into these questions. As a product marketer, it's your job to know your customers inside out. Intercom, when used with this understanding, can be a powerful ally in your marketing arsenal.

Useberry - for Unmoderated User Tests

It's surprising how little buzz there is about it. The team in Greece has been bootstrapping for over five years, focusing more on development than marketing. This low-key approach might explain its under-the-radar status. I've got no ties with Useberry, just sharing my honest take.

Let's dive into unmoderated user testing. It's about getting feedback on your product without being in the room. Think Figma prototypes, copy tests, and quick five-second screenshot tests. It's all about understanding how users interact with your product in a real-world setting. The options for conducting these tests are varied, but Useberry bundles them all together.

What stands out about Useberry is its value for money. It offers a comprehensive suite of testing tools that are not only affordable but also user-friendly. In comparison to more well-known tools like Maze, Useberry really hits the mark. Maze is great for learning the ropes of user testing (with their extensive guides), but when it comes to the actionable insights, Useberry's the go-to. I've run over 100 tests with it and the insights have been invaluable.

Another cool feature? You can find people on platforms like MTurk to perform quick, one to two-minute tasks. It's amazing how much you can learn in just a few days from these short, focused tests.

The only hiccup I encountered was with the welcome screen. It didn't quite hit the mark for me in terms of feel and customization. But that's just a personal preference. Overall, Useberry is a solid tool that's definitely worth checking out.

Notion - to have a product marketing wiki for all the teams to stay aligned

Well this is something you might want to skip as you already familiar with it. And I am not here to reveal you the power of Notion. Most likely you already know that (and if not simple googling will be way more helpful than my talking).

What I want to talk explicitly about is how helpful it could be for one thing - bringing other teams of your company attention together around the product marketing efforts, or more specifically - your customers shoes as it’s all about them at the end of the day.

Explain that the problem is there're just so many not user-centered companies out there that really don’t understate damn about what their customers need. So the product marketing role implies that this person or team should breach the gap between the customers and their world and the specific product & marketing teams of a company and their world.

And while in the ideal companies these product marketing roles exist because other teams simply don’t have time to do the user reasearch and benefit a lot from just digesting the research created by PMMs, the reality is that the majority of product marketers exist because other teams simply don’t care about customers. And your job is to change this.

So this lengthy intro was to come to a point why I think Notion is cool for this. Because it’s very easy to use and just enjoyable to a degree that can help you with engaging others. Of course it’s only one piece of it and explain that there’re other things you should be doing like engaging stakeholders on interviews, sending emails, conducting meetings. But at the end of the day the research should be stored in one place. And should be highly accessible to everyone else, outside of product marketing teams.

It’s great if you made the google docs work for you or Confluence (which I’d never use for anything but development documentation, but you know there’re different people out there). If you don’t have it yet - I highly suggest to stick with Notion for the exact reasons above. It just simply does the job.

What are the best product marketing tools available in the market?

The top 5 product marketing tools in the market are User Interviews, Posthog, Intercom, Useberry, and Notion. These tools offer a range of features to help you with marketing automation, qualitative feedback collection, analytics tracking and user testing which is all you need as a product marketer.

Wrapping up - give them a test before making a call

Let's wrap this up. Remember, this list isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to your best product marketing tools needs. It's based on my personal experiences and what I found valuable. These tools worked wonders for me, and our target market but that doesn't guarantee the same for you. Your use case and product marketing strategy might be different.

Before you commit to any of these different tools, give them a test run. See how they fit with your workflow, your product, and most importantly, your users. At the end of the day, the tools you choose should serve your customers above all else. They're the true north of your product marketing journey. So, experiment, evaluate, and choose the tools that align best with your goals and your users' needs. Happy tool hunting.

Looking for the best product marketing tools? You got to the right place.

We've tested 56 tools to create an unbiased list of tools- none of which have paid for their placement.

Ready? Let's dive in!

TLDR:

  1. User Interviews: Great for finding participants for user testing.

  2. Posthog or Mixpanel: Excellent choices for product and customer behavior analytics.

  3. Intercom: Ideal for creating user onboarding guides and new product features announcements.

  4. Useberry: A hidden gem for unmoderated user tests.

  5. Notion: Perfect to create a product marketing wiki, keeping all teams aligned. Product marketing is a crucial aspect of any successful business. To help you navigate the world of product marketing, here are my top 5 tools and a brief review of each.

What is the Product Marketing Tools in a Nutshell

Product marketing tools are your go-to gadgets for two main goals: understanding your target audience better and helping users on their product journey. Let's break these down.

Understanding Your Users

To really get what your potential customers need, you've got to dig deep in your target market. This is where tools for gathering qualitative feedback come in. Think of these as your ears on the ground. They let you hear what your users say, how they feel, and what they truly want from your product. Remember to solicit feedback and analyze customer data regularly.

We're talking about surveys that ask the right questions, analytics tools that show user behavior, and customer feedback platforms that bring honest opinions to your desk. It's not just about collecting data, but about making sense of it to tailor your product and marketing campaigns.

Assisting Users Along Their Journey

Now, onto guiding your users. It's all about crafting those hyper-targeted in-app experiences. Imagine a GPS for your product, showing the user the quickest route to what they need. It's about efficiency and relevance.

If your user needs X, your product doesn't just offer X, it makes finding and using X as smooth as possible. This means personalized experiences, intuitive design, and features that resonate with the user's needs. It's not just about having a great product, but about making sure your users realize it's great because it's easy to use and meets their needs effectively. Building experiences is a great way to drive user engagement.

In essence, top-notch product marketing tools are your secret sauce to not just meet but exceed user expectations. They help product marketing managers listen, understand, and respond in ways that make your users feel valued and understood.

How Did I End Up Testing 42 Tools

As someone always championing users in startups, making users happy has always been my top priority. This is precisely what product marketing teams aim to do. But to do this well, you need the right tools, different ones for different tasks. Here's how I structured my search:

1. Tools for Interviews and User Testing

User testing and interviews are extremely important for delving into the minds of your users. They allow you to have direct conversations, observe real-time usage of your product, and gain deep insights into the user experience. Tools in this category, such as Drift, are designed to facilitate these interactions, making them more efficient and insightful while also helping you collect more user data.

User Testing Platforms

Using platforms like User Interviews, I've been able to directly observe how different users interact with a product. These platforms offer a mix of demographic profiles, allowing for a broad understanding of user behavior and customer segments. In one project, for instance, watching a user struggle with a navigation menu led to a significant design overhaul. The platform's screen recording feature was invaluable in capturing these moments.

Scheduling Tools

Tools like Calendly have streamlined the process of arranging interviews. I remember a project where coordinating interviews was a hassle due to timezone differences. With a scheduling tool, participants could choose their own slots, cutting down the back-and-forth emails significantly. This efficiency meant we could conduct more interviews in a shorter period, enriching our data pool. Additionally, using tools like CoSchedule, product marketers can schedule content and social media posts, manage their team, and collaborate with other product marketers in one place.

Video Conferencing Tools

Platforms like Zoom or Google Meet have become more than just a means to conduct interviews - they're a window into the user's world. Recording these sessions using something like Spoke App allows for a deeper analysis post-interview. I recall an instance where the non-verbal cues of a user, observed in a recorded session, helped us fix the usability checkout problem stopping 10% of users from getting a subscription

Prototype Testing Tools

Tools like ProtoPie or Figma are just the best for prototype testing. We use Figma all the time to quickly iterate on a design based on real-time feedback during user testing sessions. The ability to make changes on the fly and immediately test those changes is a game-changer.

Each of these tools plays a crucial role in the user testing and interview process, offering a window into the user's mind and experience. They're not just about collecting data, but about understanding stories, challenges, and opportunities from the user's perspective.

2. Tools for Product and Behavior Analytics

Understanding user behavior is like reading a map of how they navigate your product. Analytics tools help track and analyze customer journey, uncovering patterns, pain points, and preferences. Here's how I use them in my projects.

Comprehensive Analytics Platforms

I often rely on platforms like Posthog and Mixpanel. They give me a comprehensive overview of user interactions. With these tools, I can track everything from user acquisition to retention, helping me pinpoint where improvements are needed.

Heatmap and Session Recording Tools

Tools like Hotjar or Fullstory extremely useful for visual insights. They show me exactly where users are clicking and how they're navigating through the site. This visual data is invaluable for understanding user behavior beyond what traditional metrics can tell me.

A/B Testing Tools

Finally, tools like VWO are must have in my toolkit for optimizing user experience. Through A/B testing, our team can make data-driven decisions about design and functionality, ensuring that every change leads to tangible improvements in user engagement and conversion rates. We test things all the time.

3. Tools for New User Onboarding

First impressions matter. Tools for onboarding new users are about creating a welcoming and intuitive experience. This is where Product-Led Growth (PLG) and PLM strategies come into play, focusing on the product itself as the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion.

Onboarding as a PLG Cornerstone

In PLG, the product is the primary driver of user acquisition, conversion, and expansion. The onboarding process, therefore, must be more than just functional. It must be an experience that hooks the user right from the start. It's about showcasing the product's value proposition in the most engaging and intuitive way possible.

Creating a Seamless Experience

When I design onboarding flows, my focus is on creating a seamless, frictionless experience. It's essential to guide users through the product's core functionalities without overwhelming them. This balance is key to retaining their interest and encouraging exploration. The onboarding process should feel like a natural progression, helping users discover features at their own pace and increase product adoption.

Personalization and User Behavior

Personalization plays a huge role in effective onboarding. By tailoring the onboarding experience to the user's behavior and preferences, the product can resonate more deeply with them, creating a personalized, consistent, and real-time customer experience. This approach can significantly boost user engagement and satisfaction. For instance, segmenting users based on their goals and providing relevant walkthroughs can make a big difference.

Feedback Loops and Adaptation

Onboarding is not a set-it-and-forget-it process. It's imperative to establish feedback loops to continually refine the onboarding experience. This means analyzing user behavior during onboarding, identifying drop-off points, and adapting the process accordingly. Regular updates and improvements based on user feedback and behavior data are essential.

Integrating Educational Elements 

Educational components like tooltips, video tutorials, or interactive guides can greatly enhance the onboarding experience. These elements should be integrated in a way that feels organic and helpful, not intrusive. They should empower users to fully utilize the product's capabilities.

The Role of Analytics in Onboarding

To optimize the onboarding process, I always heavily rely on analytics tools. These tools help me understand how new users interact with the onboarding flow and where they might encounter difficulties. This data is critical for making informed decisions about how to improve the onboarding experience.

Community and Support

Finally, building a community and providing excellent support are part of effective onboarding. Users should feel they have easy access to help and resources, and connecting them with a community can enhance their sense of belonging and loyalty to the product.

4. Tools for Conducting User Tests

For moderated tests, simple tools like Zoom work fine. But for unmoderated tests, where users interact with your product on their own, specialized tools are needed to capture user experience and user feedback accurately.

Moderated User Tests

In moderated tests, you directly interact with users as they navigate through the product. This setup allows for immediate feedback and clarification. Tools like Zoom are excellent for these sessions. They offer a simple, reliable platform for video conferencing, screen sharing, and recording sessions. The ability to see and talk to users in real-time provides invaluable insights for product managers. It helps in understanding their thought processes, feelings, and reactions to the product.

Unmoderated User Tests

Unmoderated tests, where users interact with the product independently, require a different set of tools. These tools need to capture user experience without the presence of a moderator. Platforms like Useberry, or Lookback are particularly useful here. They offer features like task creation, screen recording, and user feedback collection. Users can perform tasks at their convenience, providing a more natural and unbiased view of their experience.

Gathering Feedback

Another essential aspect of unmoderated testing tools is their ability to gather feedback. Many of these tools allow users to leave comments or answer questions during or after the test. This feedback is often more candid and revealing, as users are not influenced by the presence of a moderator.

Analyzing Results

Once the tests are completed, the next step is analyzing the results. Above I mentioned the tools that offer robust analytics features. These can include heatmaps, click maps, and user journey analyses. This data helps in identifying patterns, understanding user behavior, and pinpointing areas for improvement.

Integrating Findings into Development

The insights gained from both moderated and unmoderated user tests are super helpful for product development. They inform design decisions, highlight usability issues, and guide feature enhancements. The key is to integrate these findings effectively into the development cycle, ensuring that user feedback directly influences the evolution of the product.

In my experience, the right tools for conducting user tests can make a significant difference in understanding and enhancing user experience. Whether it’s through real-time interactions in moderated tests or independent user exploration in unmoderated tests, the whole idea of user testing helps creating products that truly meet their needs and expectations.

5. Tools to Organize and Share Insights

It's not just about gathering valuable insights, but about making them accessible and understandable to your team. Tools in this category help organize data into segments, personas, and avatars, making it easy for everyone to grasp and use this information.

Building User Personas

Creating user personas is a powerful way to humanize data. I use tools that help in synthesizing data from various sources to build comprehensive user personas. These personas represent typical users and their behaviors, preferences, and needs. This approach helps the team to better understand and empathize with our users, guiding more user-centric product development and marketing strategies.

Developing Avatars for Engagement:

Avatars go a step further than personas. They are more detailed and personalized representations of user segments. I’ve found that tools which allow for the creation of detailed avatars can greatly enhance the team's ability to relate to and understand the needs of different user groups. This results in more targeted and effective product features and marketing campaigns.

Collaborative Platforms for Sharing Insights:

Collaboration is key in making insights actionable. I rely on platforms that facilitate easy sharing and collaboration on insights. Tools like Confluence or Trello are excellent for this, as they allow team members to access, comment on, and discuss insights in a centralized space. This collaborative environment ensures that insights lead to collective action and informed decision-making, making content creation more efficient.

Integrating Insights into Workflow:

Finally, integrating these insights into the daily workflow is crucial. I use tools that can be integrated into our existing work processes, ensuring that insights are not just a one-time revelation but a continuous part of our decision-making process.

In summary, organizing and sharing insights is a critical process in any data-driven product marketing team. The right tools, such as product management tools, not only make data more accessible and understandable but also ensure that these insights are seamlessly integrated into every aspect of the product development and marketing process, driving informed decisions and strategies.

Frustrated by the biased top results in a simple Google search, I realized trial and error was the only way to go. I started with a massive list and trimmed it down to 42 tools, categorizing them into the five groups mentioned.

For each category, I tested several options, evaluating them based on cost, usability, and valuable features. Below, you'll find a detailed spreadsheet with my findings.

Top 5 winners you should add to you stack right now

User Interviews - For Testers Search

When it comes to sourcing participants for user tests, User Interviews stands out as a must-have tool for lots of product marketing campaigns. Its main strength? A seamless experience in finding the right testers. Unlike other platforms that can be pricey and limited in options, User Interviews offers an extensive pool of testers without breaking the bank.

Here's the deal: 85% of their testers are spot-on, meeting my specific criteria. This high match rate is crucial for effective user interviews. You don't waste time sifting through irrelevant candidates.

The pricing is another win. At $90 per B2B tester, plus a custom incentive, it's a bargain. I usually set the incentive at around $1 per minute, which feels fair and has worked well for me. The overall experience with User Interviews? Smooth, efficient, and cost-effective. It's a no-brainer for anyone serious about getting quality feedback through user testing.

Posthog or Mixpanel - For Product and Behavioral Analytics

Choosing the right tool for product and behavioral analytics wasn't a walk in the park. I tested some big names: Amplitude, Mixpanel, Posthog, Heaps, and Kissmetrics. Each of these requires a hefty setup, so it's not something you can trial quickly. But after thorough testing, two stood out: Posthog and Mixpanel.

Why Posthog?

Posthog is your go-to if you're looking for something robust yet user-friendly. It covers a wide range of stuff, probably about 95% of what you'll need in analytics. Plus, it's surprisingly affordable. Posthog has decent visuals – good enough to glean valuable insights. It boasts a range of features like session recording, various analysis models (funnels, retention, stickiness), and A/B testing. The A/B testing feature means you don't have to fork out extra for tools like LaunchDarkly, which your developers will appreciate for its feature flags. Feature flags are a developer's best friend, letting them toggle certain features on or off without deploying new code. Posthog also includes surveys, and they work well, backed by an active community and product team responsive to customer needs.

Why Mixpanel?

On the other hand, if you're after something a bit more polished and user-friendly and don't mind spending more, Mixpanel is a solid choice. However, note that it doesn't include behavior tracking like Hotjar or Fullstory, so you might need to invest in those separately. If that's not a deal-breaker for you, Mixpanel is excellent for getting insights about your website visitors.

In summary, Posthog is a one-stop shop for a lot of your needs and works seamlessly. Mixpanel, while a bit more upscale, may require additional tools for comprehensive tracking. Both are great, but if I had to choose one, I'd lean towards Posthog for its all-in-one functionality and cost-effectiveness.

Intercom - For User Onboarding Guides

Intercom, known for its customer support chatbot, also a powerful tool for onboarding tours and checklists functionality. It's a gem for crafting proactive, engaging onboarding experiences, shifting from the traditional reactive support approach. And can also in my opinion replace you other expensive email marketing tools.

Initially, I considered Appcues. They're known in the space, and I have connections with the team. However, after a deeper dive, I realized Intercom was a step ahead. Appcues' interface, feeling a bit dated like something from 2010, didn't quite click for me. In contrast, Intercom's flow was smooth and intuitive.

What Makes Intercom Stand Out?

The key feature I love in Intercom is the "Series" function. It lets you map out all your communication touchpoints in a single, cohesive flow, enhancing customer engagement. This includes everything from chatbot pop-ups and banners to spotlight tours and checklists. The beauty lies in how you can weave these elements together to guide users swiftly to the value they seek from your product. No unnecessary, skippable steps. Just a straight path to high user activation rates.

Why Intercom is a Tactical Tool

Intercom is a tactical tool that improves your existing product marketing strategy, specifically in terms of customer communication. It's not about using the tool to define your strategy, but about the tool supporting and executing the strategy you've already set. To get the most out of it, understanding your customer avatar is crucial. Who are your users? What are they looking to achieve with your product?

Reading up on PLG Onboarding and customer avatar building can offer deeper insights into these questions. As a product marketer, it's your job to know your customers inside out. Intercom, when used with this understanding, can be a powerful ally in your marketing arsenal.

Useberry - for Unmoderated User Tests

It's surprising how little buzz there is about it. The team in Greece has been bootstrapping for over five years, focusing more on development than marketing. This low-key approach might explain its under-the-radar status. I've got no ties with Useberry, just sharing my honest take.

Let's dive into unmoderated user testing. It's about getting feedback on your product without being in the room. Think Figma prototypes, copy tests, and quick five-second screenshot tests. It's all about understanding how users interact with your product in a real-world setting. The options for conducting these tests are varied, but Useberry bundles them all together.

What stands out about Useberry is its value for money. It offers a comprehensive suite of testing tools that are not only affordable but also user-friendly. In comparison to more well-known tools like Maze, Useberry really hits the mark. Maze is great for learning the ropes of user testing (with their extensive guides), but when it comes to the actionable insights, Useberry's the go-to. I've run over 100 tests with it and the insights have been invaluable.

Another cool feature? You can find people on platforms like MTurk to perform quick, one to two-minute tasks. It's amazing how much you can learn in just a few days from these short, focused tests.

The only hiccup I encountered was with the welcome screen. It didn't quite hit the mark for me in terms of feel and customization. But that's just a personal preference. Overall, Useberry is a solid tool that's definitely worth checking out.

Notion - to have a product marketing wiki for all the teams to stay aligned

Well this is something you might want to skip as you already familiar with it. And I am not here to reveal you the power of Notion. Most likely you already know that (and if not simple googling will be way more helpful than my talking).

What I want to talk explicitly about is how helpful it could be for one thing - bringing other teams of your company attention together around the product marketing efforts, or more specifically - your customers shoes as it’s all about them at the end of the day.

Explain that the problem is there're just so many not user-centered companies out there that really don’t understate damn about what their customers need. So the product marketing role implies that this person or team should breach the gap between the customers and their world and the specific product & marketing teams of a company and their world.

And while in the ideal companies these product marketing roles exist because other teams simply don’t have time to do the user reasearch and benefit a lot from just digesting the research created by PMMs, the reality is that the majority of product marketers exist because other teams simply don’t care about customers. And your job is to change this.

So this lengthy intro was to come to a point why I think Notion is cool for this. Because it’s very easy to use and just enjoyable to a degree that can help you with engaging others. Of course it’s only one piece of it and explain that there’re other things you should be doing like engaging stakeholders on interviews, sending emails, conducting meetings. But at the end of the day the research should be stored in one place. And should be highly accessible to everyone else, outside of product marketing teams.

It’s great if you made the google docs work for you or Confluence (which I’d never use for anything but development documentation, but you know there’re different people out there). If you don’t have it yet - I highly suggest to stick with Notion for the exact reasons above. It just simply does the job.

What are the best product marketing tools available in the market?

The top 5 product marketing tools in the market are User Interviews, Posthog, Intercom, Useberry, and Notion. These tools offer a range of features to help you with marketing automation, qualitative feedback collection, analytics tracking and user testing which is all you need as a product marketer.

Wrapping up - give them a test before making a call

Let's wrap this up. Remember, this list isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to your best product marketing tools needs. It's based on my personal experiences and what I found valuable. These tools worked wonders for me, and our target market but that doesn't guarantee the same for you. Your use case and product marketing strategy might be different.

Before you commit to any of these different tools, give them a test run. See how they fit with your workflow, your product, and most importantly, your users. At the end of the day, the tools you choose should serve your customers above all else. They're the true north of your product marketing journey. So, experiment, evaluate, and choose the tools that align best with your goals and your users' needs. Happy tool hunting.

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.