Sales Funnel vs Pipeline - Which One Is Your Revenue Superhero?

By

Aleks Tiupikov

Apr 4, 2024

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I worked in sales ops for 2 years and there was one thing I had to clarify all the time: "Sales Funnel vs Pipeline? What should we use"

It's not hard to google it and find some basic explanation on what the key differences are. And in most cases it will give you a good picture of what these mean.

But I think it'd be more important to understand if sales funnel or pipeline can actually be applicable in your situation and why they are so valuable in revenue context.

Set them up incorrectly and it can hurt your bottom line. But making a good use will lead to more goals that your team can hit.

So let's dive in.

Sales Funnel vs Pipeline: What's the difference?

The sales funnel is basically a visual representation of the buyer's journey from awareness to purchase. Whereas the sales pipeline represents the various stages of your sales process, things your sales reps have to do to close the deal.

In simpler terms, the sales funnel is more customer-centric, while the sales pipeline is more sales team-centric. You can think of your sales funnel as a way to measure and understand how your sales pipeline works.

Understanding the Sales Funnel:

Sales funnel consists of different stages that potential customers go through, starting from the top (first noticing about you) to the bottom (conversion).

The typical stages include

  1. Awareness

  2. Interest

  3. Consideration

  4. Intent

  5. Sale.

Keep in mind that this is just a general overview and it has to be adopted to a specific sales funnel you're measuring. There's usually more than 1 funnel you need to create to use this concept work correctly.

For example let's say your sales team is doing a cold outreach to all restraunts in the area, offering them a free digital menu transformation. Here's how your funnel might look like:

  1. # of calls & emails done (Awareness)

  2. # of people checked out your landing page (Interest)

  3. # of people scheduled a demo call with you (Consideration)

  4. # of people who agreed to do it (intent)

  5. # of people who actually paid you money (purchase)

The idea behind the sales funnel is to monitor and optimize the conversion rate at each step. It helps in identifying bottlenecks and areas that require improvement in your sales process.

The more granular you can get - the better. The idea is to find these low hanging fruits and address them immediately.

So while others will push their team to do 100 calls a day to close 5 deals, you can improve the middle steps of the funnel and close 7 deals while doing 50 calls.

Remember it's all about the returns on your resources spent.

Why is the Sales Funnel Important?

The sales funnel helps sales teams prioritize their efforts and focus on leads that have a higher probability of converting.

It gives a clear overview of the entire sales process and enables better management of resources and time.

Furthermore, the sales funnel allows for effective lead nurturing. By understanding where a customer is in the funnel, you can tailor your communication and marketing efforts accordingly.

For example, if a lead is in the consideration stage, you can provide them with case studies or testimonials to help sway their decision in your favor.

So make sure you spend a good amount of time brainstorming what's happening right now in your sales funnel and what can you do to improve it.

Now sales pipeleine is a different kind of beast.

Understanding the Sales Pipeline

The sales pipeline is a more detailed and action-oriented view of the sales process. It breaks down each stage of the funnel into specific steps and activities that your sales team should undertake to move prospects closer to a sale.

Imagine the sales pipeline as a roadmap for your sales reps. It lays out the exact route they need to take, complete with pit stops and checkpoints, to guide a lead from initial contact to closed deal.

It ensures that your team is consistently executing the right actions at the right time. And more importantly helps eliminate guesswork and provides a standardized approach to selling.

Plus, a robust sales pipeline allows you to forecast revenue more accurately. By tracking the number of deals in each stage of the pipeline and their respective values, you can predict how much revenue you're likely to generate in a given period.

This is something your CRO or CFO would love to see. And the longer you've been executing on this particular pipeline the more accurate would be the predictions. Make sure to use this data to your advantage.

But you can't just do it once and forget it

But here's the thing: your sales pipeline is only as strong as your ability to manage it effectively. That means regularly reviewing and updating it based on data and feedback from your team.

What I like to do is having a meeting once every week, typically on monday to analyze the pipeline and the progress the team is making there. This is a great opportunity to spot the

So take the time to map out your ideal sales pipeline, and make sure everyone on your team is on board with following it consistently. Trust me, it'll make a world of difference in your sales results.


How to fit Sales Pipeline and Funnel Into Your Strategy

Knowing the theory behind sales pipelines and funnels is not enough. If you've never set them up before, you might struggle to convert that knowledge into practice.

So, let me briefly outline the process—the way I do it, and the way I've seen many other successful sales leaders approach it.

Sales Pipeline How To Guide

Before diving into the intricacies of your sales pipeline, take a moment to reflect on your overall sales strategy.

  • What are your goals?

  • What's your go-to-market (GTM) plan?

These considerations will serve as the foundation for your sales pipeline.

Once you have a clear picture of your sales game plan, focus on the frontline of your strategy. Where does your ideal customer profile (ICP) live, and what tactics do you have in place to reach them?

Think through the entire journey:

  1. When you reach them, how do you reach them?

  2. What is the next step your sales team takes after the initial conversation?

  3. How do you typically close the deal?

The key is to outline and create content for each of these stages. You don't need any fancy tools for that—just open up a Google Doc and write down the scripts and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for each stage of your sales pipeline. This way, your team will always be aware of what to do and what to say.

Keep in mind that you'll typically need to divide each stage into different sections depending on the tactic. For example, if you do cold outreach via LinkedIn, this will have its own SOPs and guide, which will differ from the approach you take for cold calling.

By following these steps and creating a comprehensive guide for your sales pipeline, you'll ensure that your team is well-equipped to navigate each stage of the sales process effectively.

Sales Funnel How To Guide

As we discussed earlier, your sales funnel is the way to measure the effectiveness of your sales pipeline. To set this up, you'll need to use analytics or business intelligence (BI) tools. Companies typically take one of two approaches to set up their sales funnel.

Some teams prefer moving all the data from different platforms and sales tools into their CRM, like Salesforce. However, this approach has limitations since Salesforce, despite trying to be the all-in-one tool, wasn't built to facilitate data aggregation.

A more flexible and equally popular approach is to create a data warehouse where you can make all the data from your tools flow into. Then, simply plug a BI software (e.g., Power BI) on top of it to build sales funnels.

Let me provide an example of how this would work for a simple sales pipeline.

Example Sales Pipeline

  1. Top of funnel: Trade shows and warm calls

  2. Mid funnel: Demos

  3. Bottom of the funnel: Signing a contract

In this case, you need to identify where you track each of these things. For example, you might track trade shows and demos in Salesforce, calls in Gong, and contract signings in QuickBooks.

To build your first funnel, follow these steps:

  1. Gather data from Salesforce, Gong, and QuickBooks in a data warehouse (like BigQuery).

  2. Connect the warehouse to a BI tool like Power BI or Datalynx.

  3. Create a funnel report where you track:

  4. The number of trade shows your sales team attended

    • The number of calls they made

    • The number of demos they got from there

    • The close rate

Now, you've got it! Every week, you can revisit this data with your team to see the progress. You can also slice down this data by different segments, such as different trade show regions or sales reps.

By following this approach, you'll have a clear, data-driven view of your sales funnel, enabling you to make informed decisions and optimize your sales process for better results.


Bringing Marketing into the Mix

Now, let's not forget about our marketing people. They play an important role in feeding the sales funnel and pipeline with qualified leads.

Marketing teams focus on attracting potential buyers through various marketing strategies, such as email marketing campaigns, social media posts, blog posts, and Google Ads. Their goal is to guide prospective customers through the awareness stage and into the consideration stage, where sales representatives can take over.

I am convinced that by working together, marketing and sales can create a seamless customer experience, from the initial marketing activity to the final purchasing decision.

Marketing automation software can help track the customer journey and provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of different marketing tactics. This data can be used to optimize the marketing funnel and improve the quality of leads being passed to sales.

To ensure a smooth handoff between marketing and sales, you need to have clear definitions what represents a qualified lead.

This is where the concept of a marketing qualified lead (MQL) and a sales qualified lead (SQL) comes into play. In short, MQLs are leads that have shown interest in your product or service through marketing efforts, while SQLs are leads that have been vetted by sales and deemed ready for the next stage in the sales pipeline.

By aligning marketing and sales efforts, companies can create a more efficient and effective sales process. Marketing can focus on attracting the right prospects and nurturing them until they're ready to be handed off to sales.

Sales can then take over and guide the prospect through the remaining stages of the pipeline, ultimately leading to a closed deal and a happy customer.

In conclusion, whether you're using a sales funnel or a sales pipeline (or both!), the key is to have a clear understanding of your customer journey and to optimize each stage of the process.

By following this guide, I hope you can create a powerful engine for driving business growth and reaching your revenue goals.

I worked in sales ops for 2 years and there was one thing I had to clarify all the time: "Sales Funnel vs Pipeline? What should we use"

It's not hard to google it and find some basic explanation on what the key differences are. And in most cases it will give you a good picture of what these mean.

But I think it'd be more important to understand if sales funnel or pipeline can actually be applicable in your situation and why they are so valuable in revenue context.

Set them up incorrectly and it can hurt your bottom line. But making a good use will lead to more goals that your team can hit.

So let's dive in.

Sales Funnel vs Pipeline: What's the difference?

The sales funnel is basically a visual representation of the buyer's journey from awareness to purchase. Whereas the sales pipeline represents the various stages of your sales process, things your sales reps have to do to close the deal.

In simpler terms, the sales funnel is more customer-centric, while the sales pipeline is more sales team-centric. You can think of your sales funnel as a way to measure and understand how your sales pipeline works.

Understanding the Sales Funnel:

Sales funnel consists of different stages that potential customers go through, starting from the top (first noticing about you) to the bottom (conversion).

The typical stages include

  1. Awareness

  2. Interest

  3. Consideration

  4. Intent

  5. Sale.

Keep in mind that this is just a general overview and it has to be adopted to a specific sales funnel you're measuring. There's usually more than 1 funnel you need to create to use this concept work correctly.

For example let's say your sales team is doing a cold outreach to all restraunts in the area, offering them a free digital menu transformation. Here's how your funnel might look like:

  1. # of calls & emails done (Awareness)

  2. # of people checked out your landing page (Interest)

  3. # of people scheduled a demo call with you (Consideration)

  4. # of people who agreed to do it (intent)

  5. # of people who actually paid you money (purchase)

The idea behind the sales funnel is to monitor and optimize the conversion rate at each step. It helps in identifying bottlenecks and areas that require improvement in your sales process.

The more granular you can get - the better. The idea is to find these low hanging fruits and address them immediately.

So while others will push their team to do 100 calls a day to close 5 deals, you can improve the middle steps of the funnel and close 7 deals while doing 50 calls.

Remember it's all about the returns on your resources spent.

Why is the Sales Funnel Important?

The sales funnel helps sales teams prioritize their efforts and focus on leads that have a higher probability of converting.

It gives a clear overview of the entire sales process and enables better management of resources and time.

Furthermore, the sales funnel allows for effective lead nurturing. By understanding where a customer is in the funnel, you can tailor your communication and marketing efforts accordingly.

For example, if a lead is in the consideration stage, you can provide them with case studies or testimonials to help sway their decision in your favor.

So make sure you spend a good amount of time brainstorming what's happening right now in your sales funnel and what can you do to improve it.

Now sales pipeleine is a different kind of beast.

Understanding the Sales Pipeline

The sales pipeline is a more detailed and action-oriented view of the sales process. It breaks down each stage of the funnel into specific steps and activities that your sales team should undertake to move prospects closer to a sale.

Imagine the sales pipeline as a roadmap for your sales reps. It lays out the exact route they need to take, complete with pit stops and checkpoints, to guide a lead from initial contact to closed deal.

It ensures that your team is consistently executing the right actions at the right time. And more importantly helps eliminate guesswork and provides a standardized approach to selling.

Plus, a robust sales pipeline allows you to forecast revenue more accurately. By tracking the number of deals in each stage of the pipeline and their respective values, you can predict how much revenue you're likely to generate in a given period.

This is something your CRO or CFO would love to see. And the longer you've been executing on this particular pipeline the more accurate would be the predictions. Make sure to use this data to your advantage.

But you can't just do it once and forget it

But here's the thing: your sales pipeline is only as strong as your ability to manage it effectively. That means regularly reviewing and updating it based on data and feedback from your team.

What I like to do is having a meeting once every week, typically on monday to analyze the pipeline and the progress the team is making there. This is a great opportunity to spot the

So take the time to map out your ideal sales pipeline, and make sure everyone on your team is on board with following it consistently. Trust me, it'll make a world of difference in your sales results.


How to fit Sales Pipeline and Funnel Into Your Strategy

Knowing the theory behind sales pipelines and funnels is not enough. If you've never set them up before, you might struggle to convert that knowledge into practice.

So, let me briefly outline the process—the way I do it, and the way I've seen many other successful sales leaders approach it.

Sales Pipeline How To Guide

Before diving into the intricacies of your sales pipeline, take a moment to reflect on your overall sales strategy.

  • What are your goals?

  • What's your go-to-market (GTM) plan?

These considerations will serve as the foundation for your sales pipeline.

Once you have a clear picture of your sales game plan, focus on the frontline of your strategy. Where does your ideal customer profile (ICP) live, and what tactics do you have in place to reach them?

Think through the entire journey:

  1. When you reach them, how do you reach them?

  2. What is the next step your sales team takes after the initial conversation?

  3. How do you typically close the deal?

The key is to outline and create content for each of these stages. You don't need any fancy tools for that—just open up a Google Doc and write down the scripts and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for each stage of your sales pipeline. This way, your team will always be aware of what to do and what to say.

Keep in mind that you'll typically need to divide each stage into different sections depending on the tactic. For example, if you do cold outreach via LinkedIn, this will have its own SOPs and guide, which will differ from the approach you take for cold calling.

By following these steps and creating a comprehensive guide for your sales pipeline, you'll ensure that your team is well-equipped to navigate each stage of the sales process effectively.

Sales Funnel How To Guide

As we discussed earlier, your sales funnel is the way to measure the effectiveness of your sales pipeline. To set this up, you'll need to use analytics or business intelligence (BI) tools. Companies typically take one of two approaches to set up their sales funnel.

Some teams prefer moving all the data from different platforms and sales tools into their CRM, like Salesforce. However, this approach has limitations since Salesforce, despite trying to be the all-in-one tool, wasn't built to facilitate data aggregation.

A more flexible and equally popular approach is to create a data warehouse where you can make all the data from your tools flow into. Then, simply plug a BI software (e.g., Power BI) on top of it to build sales funnels.

Let me provide an example of how this would work for a simple sales pipeline.

Example Sales Pipeline

  1. Top of funnel: Trade shows and warm calls

  2. Mid funnel: Demos

  3. Bottom of the funnel: Signing a contract

In this case, you need to identify where you track each of these things. For example, you might track trade shows and demos in Salesforce, calls in Gong, and contract signings in QuickBooks.

To build your first funnel, follow these steps:

  1. Gather data from Salesforce, Gong, and QuickBooks in a data warehouse (like BigQuery).

  2. Connect the warehouse to a BI tool like Power BI or Datalynx.

  3. Create a funnel report where you track:

  4. The number of trade shows your sales team attended

    • The number of calls they made

    • The number of demos they got from there

    • The close rate

Now, you've got it! Every week, you can revisit this data with your team to see the progress. You can also slice down this data by different segments, such as different trade show regions or sales reps.

By following this approach, you'll have a clear, data-driven view of your sales funnel, enabling you to make informed decisions and optimize your sales process for better results.


Bringing Marketing into the Mix

Now, let's not forget about our marketing people. They play an important role in feeding the sales funnel and pipeline with qualified leads.

Marketing teams focus on attracting potential buyers through various marketing strategies, such as email marketing campaigns, social media posts, blog posts, and Google Ads. Their goal is to guide prospective customers through the awareness stage and into the consideration stage, where sales representatives can take over.

I am convinced that by working together, marketing and sales can create a seamless customer experience, from the initial marketing activity to the final purchasing decision.

Marketing automation software can help track the customer journey and provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of different marketing tactics. This data can be used to optimize the marketing funnel and improve the quality of leads being passed to sales.

To ensure a smooth handoff between marketing and sales, you need to have clear definitions what represents a qualified lead.

This is where the concept of a marketing qualified lead (MQL) and a sales qualified lead (SQL) comes into play. In short, MQLs are leads that have shown interest in your product or service through marketing efforts, while SQLs are leads that have been vetted by sales and deemed ready for the next stage in the sales pipeline.

By aligning marketing and sales efforts, companies can create a more efficient and effective sales process. Marketing can focus on attracting the right prospects and nurturing them until they're ready to be handed off to sales.

Sales can then take over and guide the prospect through the remaining stages of the pipeline, ultimately leading to a closed deal and a happy customer.

In conclusion, whether you're using a sales funnel or a sales pipeline (or both!), the key is to have a clear understanding of your customer journey and to optimize each stage of the process.

By following this guide, I hope you can create a powerful engine for driving business growth and reaching your revenue goals.

I worked in sales ops for 2 years and there was one thing I had to clarify all the time: "Sales Funnel vs Pipeline? What should we use"

It's not hard to google it and find some basic explanation on what the key differences are. And in most cases it will give you a good picture of what these mean.

But I think it'd be more important to understand if sales funnel or pipeline can actually be applicable in your situation and why they are so valuable in revenue context.

Set them up incorrectly and it can hurt your bottom line. But making a good use will lead to more goals that your team can hit.

So let's dive in.

Sales Funnel vs Pipeline: What's the difference?

The sales funnel is basically a visual representation of the buyer's journey from awareness to purchase. Whereas the sales pipeline represents the various stages of your sales process, things your sales reps have to do to close the deal.

In simpler terms, the sales funnel is more customer-centric, while the sales pipeline is more sales team-centric. You can think of your sales funnel as a way to measure and understand how your sales pipeline works.

Understanding the Sales Funnel:

Sales funnel consists of different stages that potential customers go through, starting from the top (first noticing about you) to the bottom (conversion).

The typical stages include

  1. Awareness

  2. Interest

  3. Consideration

  4. Intent

  5. Sale.

Keep in mind that this is just a general overview and it has to be adopted to a specific sales funnel you're measuring. There's usually more than 1 funnel you need to create to use this concept work correctly.

For example let's say your sales team is doing a cold outreach to all restraunts in the area, offering them a free digital menu transformation. Here's how your funnel might look like:

  1. # of calls & emails done (Awareness)

  2. # of people checked out your landing page (Interest)

  3. # of people scheduled a demo call with you (Consideration)

  4. # of people who agreed to do it (intent)

  5. # of people who actually paid you money (purchase)

The idea behind the sales funnel is to monitor and optimize the conversion rate at each step. It helps in identifying bottlenecks and areas that require improvement in your sales process.

The more granular you can get - the better. The idea is to find these low hanging fruits and address them immediately.

So while others will push their team to do 100 calls a day to close 5 deals, you can improve the middle steps of the funnel and close 7 deals while doing 50 calls.

Remember it's all about the returns on your resources spent.

Why is the Sales Funnel Important?

The sales funnel helps sales teams prioritize their efforts and focus on leads that have a higher probability of converting.

It gives a clear overview of the entire sales process and enables better management of resources and time.

Furthermore, the sales funnel allows for effective lead nurturing. By understanding where a customer is in the funnel, you can tailor your communication and marketing efforts accordingly.

For example, if a lead is in the consideration stage, you can provide them with case studies or testimonials to help sway their decision in your favor.

So make sure you spend a good amount of time brainstorming what's happening right now in your sales funnel and what can you do to improve it.

Now sales pipeleine is a different kind of beast.

Understanding the Sales Pipeline

The sales pipeline is a more detailed and action-oriented view of the sales process. It breaks down each stage of the funnel into specific steps and activities that your sales team should undertake to move prospects closer to a sale.

Imagine the sales pipeline as a roadmap for your sales reps. It lays out the exact route they need to take, complete with pit stops and checkpoints, to guide a lead from initial contact to closed deal.

It ensures that your team is consistently executing the right actions at the right time. And more importantly helps eliminate guesswork and provides a standardized approach to selling.

Plus, a robust sales pipeline allows you to forecast revenue more accurately. By tracking the number of deals in each stage of the pipeline and their respective values, you can predict how much revenue you're likely to generate in a given period.

This is something your CRO or CFO would love to see. And the longer you've been executing on this particular pipeline the more accurate would be the predictions. Make sure to use this data to your advantage.

But you can't just do it once and forget it

But here's the thing: your sales pipeline is only as strong as your ability to manage it effectively. That means regularly reviewing and updating it based on data and feedback from your team.

What I like to do is having a meeting once every week, typically on monday to analyze the pipeline and the progress the team is making there. This is a great opportunity to spot the

So take the time to map out your ideal sales pipeline, and make sure everyone on your team is on board with following it consistently. Trust me, it'll make a world of difference in your sales results.


How to fit Sales Pipeline and Funnel Into Your Strategy

Knowing the theory behind sales pipelines and funnels is not enough. If you've never set them up before, you might struggle to convert that knowledge into practice.

So, let me briefly outline the process—the way I do it, and the way I've seen many other successful sales leaders approach it.

Sales Pipeline How To Guide

Before diving into the intricacies of your sales pipeline, take a moment to reflect on your overall sales strategy.

  • What are your goals?

  • What's your go-to-market (GTM) plan?

These considerations will serve as the foundation for your sales pipeline.

Once you have a clear picture of your sales game plan, focus on the frontline of your strategy. Where does your ideal customer profile (ICP) live, and what tactics do you have in place to reach them?

Think through the entire journey:

  1. When you reach them, how do you reach them?

  2. What is the next step your sales team takes after the initial conversation?

  3. How do you typically close the deal?

The key is to outline and create content for each of these stages. You don't need any fancy tools for that—just open up a Google Doc and write down the scripts and standard operating procedures (SOPs) for each stage of your sales pipeline. This way, your team will always be aware of what to do and what to say.

Keep in mind that you'll typically need to divide each stage into different sections depending on the tactic. For example, if you do cold outreach via LinkedIn, this will have its own SOPs and guide, which will differ from the approach you take for cold calling.

By following these steps and creating a comprehensive guide for your sales pipeline, you'll ensure that your team is well-equipped to navigate each stage of the sales process effectively.

Sales Funnel How To Guide

As we discussed earlier, your sales funnel is the way to measure the effectiveness of your sales pipeline. To set this up, you'll need to use analytics or business intelligence (BI) tools. Companies typically take one of two approaches to set up their sales funnel.

Some teams prefer moving all the data from different platforms and sales tools into their CRM, like Salesforce. However, this approach has limitations since Salesforce, despite trying to be the all-in-one tool, wasn't built to facilitate data aggregation.

A more flexible and equally popular approach is to create a data warehouse where you can make all the data from your tools flow into. Then, simply plug a BI software (e.g., Power BI) on top of it to build sales funnels.

Let me provide an example of how this would work for a simple sales pipeline.

Example Sales Pipeline

  1. Top of funnel: Trade shows and warm calls

  2. Mid funnel: Demos

  3. Bottom of the funnel: Signing a contract

In this case, you need to identify where you track each of these things. For example, you might track trade shows and demos in Salesforce, calls in Gong, and contract signings in QuickBooks.

To build your first funnel, follow these steps:

  1. Gather data from Salesforce, Gong, and QuickBooks in a data warehouse (like BigQuery).

  2. Connect the warehouse to a BI tool like Power BI or Datalynx.

  3. Create a funnel report where you track:

  4. The number of trade shows your sales team attended

    • The number of calls they made

    • The number of demos they got from there

    • The close rate

Now, you've got it! Every week, you can revisit this data with your team to see the progress. You can also slice down this data by different segments, such as different trade show regions or sales reps.

By following this approach, you'll have a clear, data-driven view of your sales funnel, enabling you to make informed decisions and optimize your sales process for better results.


Bringing Marketing into the Mix

Now, let's not forget about our marketing people. They play an important role in feeding the sales funnel and pipeline with qualified leads.

Marketing teams focus on attracting potential buyers through various marketing strategies, such as email marketing campaigns, social media posts, blog posts, and Google Ads. Their goal is to guide prospective customers through the awareness stage and into the consideration stage, where sales representatives can take over.

I am convinced that by working together, marketing and sales can create a seamless customer experience, from the initial marketing activity to the final purchasing decision.

Marketing automation software can help track the customer journey and provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of different marketing tactics. This data can be used to optimize the marketing funnel and improve the quality of leads being passed to sales.

To ensure a smooth handoff between marketing and sales, you need to have clear definitions what represents a qualified lead.

This is where the concept of a marketing qualified lead (MQL) and a sales qualified lead (SQL) comes into play. In short, MQLs are leads that have shown interest in your product or service through marketing efforts, while SQLs are leads that have been vetted by sales and deemed ready for the next stage in the sales pipeline.

By aligning marketing and sales efforts, companies can create a more efficient and effective sales process. Marketing can focus on attracting the right prospects and nurturing them until they're ready to be handed off to sales.

Sales can then take over and guide the prospect through the remaining stages of the pipeline, ultimately leading to a closed deal and a happy customer.

In conclusion, whether you're using a sales funnel or a sales pipeline (or both!), the key is to have a clear understanding of your customer journey and to optimize each stage of the process.

By following this guide, I hope you can create a powerful engine for driving business growth and reaching your revenue goals.

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Start retrieving the insights in your own language

Think about the last time you had a question about your data. How long did it take to answer it?

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.

Copyright © 2024 Docugenie, Inc.